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Recycled Tile Under the Sea!

Posted by: Kali • Apr 25

Recycled Tile Under the Sea!

We are honored to be able to help the Reefs of Tomorrow Initiative with their coral reef rehabilitation project. We used our Debris Series Recycled Tile to custom make several unique tile shapes that are being used to study interaction between Parrot fish and coral reefs. The tile is able to serve as a sort of underwater petri dish that scientists are able to monitor over time and easily remove for study.


Here’s a little more about the Reefs Tomorrow Initiative:


“Around the world, the health of coral reefs is threatened by numerous factors including increasing temperatures, overfishing, pollution, and sedimentation. Despite these threats, some reefs show remarkable resiliency and are thriving. The Reefs Tomorrow Initiative is a collaboration among scientists from academic institutions and conservation organizations who are using computer models and field studies to investigate how healthy reefs respond to multiple and simultaneous threats. Working closely with managers and using our improved understanding of how reefs function, we are building new tools that reef stewards can use to evaluate trade-off decisions and restore reef resiliency. Members of the Reefs Tomorrow Initiative include the American Museum of Natural History, the Coral Reef Alliance, The Nature Conservancy, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Stanford University, University of California Santa Barbara, University of North Carolina Wilmington, and Victoria University of Wellington. Initial funding for the Reefs Tomorrow Initiative has been provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.”

The holes are drilled to allow scientists to easily attach and remove the tile

Some tiles have been scraped to encourage coral growth. 

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