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Shannon Malone

Shannon Malone

Social Media Maven

Shannon joined the team in 2013 as Fireclay's Social Media Maven. After graduating from the University of California Santa Cruz with a degree in Cultural Anthropology, Shannon pursued her lifelong passion for interior design by working as a freelance writer for Houzz. Her interest in design related content eventually led her to Fireclay where she gets to spend her day spreading the Fireclay word and help get tile to the people!

Favorite thing about Fireclay: The beautiful handmade nature of our tile, especially our new Handpainted Collections.

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Susanne Redfield

Susanne Redfield

Creative Consultant

Tile designer and ceramist Susanne Kibak Redfield merges her Danish roots and love of traditional crafts with a modern sense of restraint that brings just enough to the design without going over the top. After graduating from the University of California Santa Cruz in 1981, Susanne started her own business making ceramic tiles. She introduced Kibak Tile through Kneedler Fauchere, a revered interior showroom to the trade, then spent twenty five years in a successful relationship with Ann Sacks. "I began hearing about Fireclay Tile, their sustainable story and youthful energy really captured my imagination, I absolutely wanted to be part a company that really cares about tomorrow. Designing product for Fireclay Tile is energizing, truly inspirational.

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Herringbone: The Wild Side of a Classic Shape

Image: Fireclay Tile

Image: Malcolm-Fearon Photography, Bliss Images; Color: White Gloss

Herringbone, the beloved pattern named after its resemblance to the skeleton of a herring, is undoubtedly a classic, spanning all the way back to the Roman Empire, where its conception stemmed from the construction of an enormous road system called the Viae Publicae.  Standard rectangular bricks were placed in an alternating arrangement, creating a zig zag effect which broke at the point of reversal.  With the weight load spread over a larger surface area, the grid of interlocking units made the paving system incredibly strong under compression.

Rather than falling with the Roman Empire, Herringbone resurfaced and became a desired architectural feature during the European Renaissance.  Soon after, the pattern gained relevance and became a popular hardwood parquet flooring choice.  Herringbone remains popular today and can be achieved in a variety of finish materials.  

Image: Fireclay Tile

Color: White Gloss

Despite its historic roots, and classic rectangular shapes, this dynamic and distinctive pattern is still relevant even in today’s most contemporary designs.  The pattern lends itself to customization, and with a little creativity, can be transformed into some pretty fun-loving designs.  Achieve a Herringbone pattern with our rectangular 2x4 field tile by interlocking each tile at a 45 degree angle.  For a custom look try experimenting with different colorways and sizes.

Image: Malcolm-Fearon Photography

Image: Malcolm-Fearon Photography, Bliss Images; Color: Mica

Who said Herringbone is only appropriate as a flooring option?  No one!  With its visually striking geometric lines, herringbone has become a unique decorative feature, adding lively dimension to any kitchen backsplash.

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