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Share your Fireclay Tile Story with Us!

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Shannon Malone

Shannon Malone

Social Media Maven

Shannon joined the team in 2013 as Fireclay's Social Media Maven. After graduating from the University of California Santa Cruz with a degree in Cultural Anthropology, Shannon pursued her lifelong passion for interior design by working as a freelance writer for Houzz. Her interest in design related content eventually led her to Fireclay where she gets to spend her day spreading the Fireclay word and help get tile to the people!

Favorite thing about Fireclay: The beautiful handmade nature of our tile, especially our new Handpainted Collections.

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Susanne Redfield

Susanne Redfield

Creative Consultant

Tile designer and ceramist Susanne Kibak Redfield merges her Danish roots and love of traditional crafts with a modern sense of restraint that brings just enough to the design without going over the top. After graduating from the University of California Santa Cruz in 1981, Susanne started her own business making ceramic tiles. She introduced Kibak Tile through Kneedler Fauchere, a revered interior showroom to the trade, then spent twenty five years in a successful relationship with Ann Sacks. "I began hearing about Fireclay Tile, their sustainable story and youthful energy really captured my imagination, I absolutely wanted to be part a company that really cares about tomorrow. Designing product for Fireclay Tile is energizing, truly inspirational.

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Contrast: Pattern Found in the Grout Joint

Our Paseo shape in Spruce with a contrasting cream grout, Image: Malcom-Fearon, Bliss Images

After hours, days, maybe even months of contemplation, you have finally narrowed down your tile, your color, and your pattern, but now you find yourself asking, “well, what about the grout?  Grout color can significantly impact the overall look and feel of your design, therefore it is imperative to decide what type of look you desire before choosing a grout color.  For those of you pattern lovers, we suggest thinking outside of the box, literally, and try a contrasting grout joint.  The contrast between your tile and your grout color will emphasize the overall pattern and layout of your tile, creating a major wow factor.

We love how a contrasting grout looks when used with geometric shapes, such as our Hexagon field tile.  The white grout is exaggerated against the deep navy blue tile, making the pattern pop.


 

Our Hexagon tile in Navy Blue with a contrasting white grout, Image: Malcom-Fearon, Bliss Images

If you like the idea of pattern in the grout joint, but are concerned a stark contrast might overpower your tile, a similar effect is easily achieved by using a grout color that is two or three shades away from your tile color.  The pattern is visible, but the tile remains the focal point.

Our tile shown in Cancun Green, Image: Malcom-Fearon, Bliss Images

A dark grout joint is a great way to add contrast to a classic white subway tile.  The contrasting grout warms up the white tile, preventing any sense of sterility while adding depth and dimension.  You can even set your tiles a bit wider for a more dramatic effect.  Not to mention, a dark grout is easier to keep clean, which is a huge bonus in a bathroom or kitchen setting!

Image via Better Homes and Gardens

Need help choosing your grout color?  We're here to help!  Fill out our Design Assistance form and one of our talented designers will get back to you within 48 hours.

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